Keeping The Home Fire Burning

 

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Alpenglow Winter Adventure #8  (24 x 12) Acrylic on Board

The repetition of painting in a series is an effective way to experiment with subtle variations in technique and color.  Capturing the essence of alpenglow has not been easy but slowly I feel that I’m getting closer.  The bad thing about moving so quickly is that the similar compositions make it a challenge to come up with a meaningful title for each piece.

I have big news to share!  Much of the work that I completed this winter has now been dispersed to two gallery spaces and is beginning to sell.  I can’t explain how good it feels to have successfully made something positive out of my illness.  I do believe they call it making lemonade out of lemons.

On the health front things are looking up as well.  My energy level continues to improve and I’ve been successfully weaning myself off of the steroids.  At the current rate of improvement, I’m hoping to be in remission by the end of the summer.  (Polymyalgia Rheumatica)

Have a great Weekend!

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Small Paintings to take to this weeks “First Friday” at the Denver Art District

 

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Finishing Matters

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Custom Made Re-Claimed Barn Wood Back Boards

I’m happy to say that I finally am feeling well enough to put the finishing touches on work that has been on deck for months.  The long standing plan for the Summer of 2017 was to become a gypsy of sorts and hit the art festival circuit in Colorado.  Metal prints of my photography come to life when I mount them on character filled backboards made by me out of re-claimed wood.  As most of you know, there is a saying about the best laid plans of mice and men and for me this year things did go awry.

Polymyalgia Rheumatica is an autoimmune disease that I didn’t even know existed nine months ago.  This 56 year old body shouted WTF at the low point last winter when just walking and touching the top of my head were difficult at best.  Finally, I can see the light at the end of the tunnel and I’m rebuilding my atrophied muscles enough so that I can get some new work sold.   Things are looking up!

I’d love to hear what you think about these pieces.  As always, comments welcome.

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Two Steps Forward

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The old saying “two steps forward and one step back” is a go-to mantra that often comforts me.  It reminds me that nothing worthwhile comes easily.  It is a way of verbalizing my intention to keep trying even when I grow tired of setbacks.

I can’t express enough how much joy painting is bringing me these days.  It is giving me a reason get up in the morning and push through the physical pain that I’m currently burdened with.  Without a strong desire to create art my forward movement would have surely ceased weeks or months ago.  Instead I am kicking and gliding like the two skiers in my painting, already thinking of the adventures to come.

Happy Friday!

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Dreaming Of Alpenglow

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My third piece in a new series is underway and the deviation from rising super moon values has been a challenge.  I’m trying to capture the essence of alpenglow which in my mind is the time of day that the last direct light from the sun is hitting the clouds and perhaps the mountain tops.  In my minds eye there is a magic that occurs in the valleys below where the snow almost glows.  Do the shadows disappear or is there just a slight contrast indicating the position of the setting or rising sun?  So many new riddles to solve.  I’ll post the finished piece soon.

Physically I had a difficult week.  Polymyalgia Rheumatica is a roller coaster ride and finding the correct dosage of prednisone to keep the inflammation in check without increasing the side effects of the medication can be the real trick.  Finally this past week I felt myself finding some balance on that front when a serious chest cold took me hostage.           Once again, having my studio and a passion to paint has been great therapy.

Now for show and tell before signing off.  One of my photographs made the front cover of Open Fences Magazine.  It was uplifting to see how great it looks and on the other hand it saddens me to think that I may not be in condition to do serious shooting this Summer.

open fences

 

 

Jump On The Brand Wagon

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Roughly half of my life experience was gathered in the pre-personal computer age. By my recollection, The “old days” came to a screeching halt sometime around the mid-80’s when IBM came out with a big box machine that had a whopping 40mb hard drive. Anyone who could afford a couple grand to have one in their own home bought one. Imagine what was going through my mind as I toyed with one of these machines for the first time the year after graduating from business school. I was prepared for nothing.  Learning how to use a Texas Instrument Calculator might as well have been time spent learning how to use an Abacus.  I realized that while I was in school learning the old game the rest of the world was busy creating a new game. Fortunately for me, I didn’t exert all of my youthful energy on academics. I was lucky to have spent my college years in the mountains of Colorado where a fair allotment of my time was devoted to outdoor adventures. Hiking and fishing and back country skiing are the experiences that I now find myself celebrating through my art.

One of the greatest lessons that any of us can learn is that everything is constantly changing and that education never stops. At some point, we are all confronted with changes in technology or changes in health that bring about a need to adapt and re-focus. . My chronic illness has for now taken me away from photography, video production and the client base that I’ve established. Over the course of the last six months I’ve redirected my focus to painting yet my marketing is lagging behind.

I started thinking about the concept of “postcards from the imagination” while writing a recent posts and I think it really represents me well. My paintings are regularly conceived in my imagination and I’ve learned a great deal about composite photography techniques which allow me to imagine new ways to present my photography. For now, my ambitions of doing shows is beyond what my health will allow but thanks to technology I have a storefront window to the world. It’s time for me to start selling some of this new work and all that stands in the way is a little hard work and a lot of education.

What do you think of my new brand?  Which banner is more effective?

artspiritvillage banner

Postcards From The Imagination

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“Midnight Powder” (9×12) Acrylic on Canvas

I don’t have to stretch much further than youthful memories and imagination to find inspiration.   The Super Moon Winter Adventure Series is a first hand account of my own escapades in the high mountains of Colorado.  It always amazed me how your could ski all night by the light of the moon.  I’m pretty sure I didn’t even carry a flashlight.  I count myself lucky that I have a way of living those experiences over and over again through painting.

My recent posts gave a few details about the painful autoimmune disease that I’m dealing with.  The real story that I hope to share is that art is a powerful healing agent.  When I’m painting I forget all about my issues.  Has art helped you or someone you know overcome adversity?  I’d love to hear about it.

As always I welcome comments and I hope you will join me on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 

Finding Balance Through Art

 

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During the winter of 2011 I found myself out of work for the first time in my adult life. Cabin bound at our remote home in the high mountains of Colorado I spent endless hours teaching myself how to paint with oils. By Spring I had completed a dozen or so pieces that I referred to as a “Full Moon Winter Adventure Series” At first my palette was limited to Paynes Grey, Titanium White and Liquin with which I concocted compositions in shades of grey. Images of mountain settings, log cabins, skiers and skaters seemed to flow from life experience and imagination with absolutely no visual reference. As the series progressed I added Cerulean Blue to better represent the atmospheric colors of a full moon winter night as well as a primary reds and yellows to represent firelight. At the time I was quite pleased with the outcome. I had leveled up as a painter; made great improvements over my earlier attempts at painting.

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“Finding Balance” 18″x24″ Oil on Canvas (2011)

I now find myself being forced to take time off from my business for health reasons. My battle with a painful autoimmune disease, Polymyalgia Rheumatica has once again left me house bound through an entire winter and once again I am striving to level up as a painter. Fifteen pieces later, I’ve completed a series that I call the “Super-moon Winter Adventure Series”. This time however, I’m using top shelf acrylics and lots of colors and I’m having a blast. I’m also experimenting with wood panels and painting board in addition to canvas. The verdict is still out on which support I prefer.

For reasons that I can’t describe, these compositions just seem incomplete without the inclusion of people. I guess I don’t really buy in to the idea that an image can be adventurous without an adventurer. My male figures often closely resemble me or at least the me of my minds eye, even if I set out to draw a human shape that is entirely different. Ooops..I did it again..that guy looks a lot like me.

Back in 2011, I painted a lonely ice skater gliding over a frozen pond and I titled it “Finding Balance”. Once again I’m compelled to compose adventurous ice skating scenes and I’ve included two of the new pieces for comparison. I’ve been so busy painting that as of yet I haven’t titled them. As always, I welcome critique and comment.

In my next post I’ll show more from the Super-moon Series and I’ll talk about a surprising way that I’m using photography to paint better. Until then take care and remember that Art Is Therapy.

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Healing With Art

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“This is no place for wimps” declared my Father as he coped with the final stages of Parkinson’s Disease. It was a mantra that would be repeated often between us, a go-to phrase that seemed to take the edge off. It was an attitude that had enabled him to adjust to a new normal as the physical casualties mounted. Up until the day he died, he managed to focus on the things that he could do rather than the things that he could not.

Just last summer I was celebrating a major life accomplishment. My photography/video production business had finally become self sustaining and I was ecstatic to be doing what I loved. The long daylight hours meant more time to squeeze in more images and I loved every minute of it but I also began to notice that my energy level was dropping and I began to feel body pains that I hadn’t felt before. By Fall, around the time of my last blog post the pain and stiffness in my muscles was so severe that I could barely walk much less lift a camera to eye level. Soon thereafter I was diagnosed with a debilitating auto immune disease known as Polymyalgia Rheumatica.

I’m not going to be the old me again anytime soon. Best case scenario is that the disease will go into remission within a year or two. In the meantime I’ve being forced to recon with a new normal that I didn’t anticipate. This is no place for wimps! Healthy daily doses of a corticosteroid are now keeping me mobile but not without continued physical challenges associated with systemic inflammation and side effects from the drugs. I’ll spare you greater details of my struggles and get straight to the point of this post.

Just like my Dad did, I’m being forced to focus on the things that I can do. At first the creative void seemed bottomless and I moped about drinking cocktails of self pity mixed with overdoses of political television, a deadly combination. After about a month of that nonsense I forced myself to pick up a paint brush and I haven’t set it aside since. I’ve learned that healing is a powerful byproduct of the act of creating art. My depression has been replaced with a calm knowing that my journey as an artist is continuing just as it was meant to. While painting I’ve learned that I can reach a meditative state that pushes physical and emotional pain to the background.

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I’m very excited to begin sharing my new artwork on a regular basis and it is my hope that someone out there might be inspired by me to embrace the healing aspects of creating art just as I have. As always, I welcome your comments and I hope that you might share your own stories about how art has helped you heal.

me with moonlight series copy

Time For A Re-Boot!

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Yes, the rumors of my demise are grossly exaggerated.  Two months have passed since my last post and I have a lot to share.  A three week, 4000 mile road trip to the Great Northwest consumed my August and September was spent getting back to work in Colorado.  Then without warning I’ve been temporarily sidelined by a condition known as Polymyalgia Rheumatica that brought on so much pain that I couldn’t even lift a camera.  I’m hopefully on the mend now.  A hefty daily dose of Prednisone relieving the symptoms while I await further evaluation and testing.

The thing is, in what seems like the blink of an eye I find myself re-examining my immediate ambitions and goals.    The Mantra above is really a get well card to myself complete with one of my favorite images from the Oregon coast (“Low Tide Long Walk” ~ Cannon Beach).   Little did I know when I shot it that it would become a symbolic reminder that every now and then you have to re-boot.