Lost Treasure From 2017

Every Which Way 2500

“More gold has been mined from the thoughts of men than has ever been taken from the earth” ~ Napoleon Hill

When I’m out and about exploring interesting and beautiful places with my camera in hand it is not unusual for me to slip into a kind of hypnotic trance and the subjects of my photographs seem to choose me rather than the other way around.  Over the course of a year I can acquire thousands and thousands of Raw images.  As you might imagine I spend hours upon hours scouring through digital files, looking for and developing the creme of the crop while the ones that aren’t quite so obviously great fall through the cracks become forgotten.

oregon textures

Being the creature of habit that I am, as I become introspective about the year that was each December, I pull that imaginary shoe box full of “negatives” from the top shelf of my imaginary closet and I look through them one more time in hopes of discovering lost treasure.  The images in this post are just a few emerging stars from 2017, all taken in late summer at the Oregon coast.

There is always a specific reason that I click the shutter release when I do but sometimes it takes a second or third cutting to remember why.

Hidden Treasure 2500

Magic Momemt 2500

Gravity 2500

Monday Mantra ~ #44

worthy

I stood barefoot in the cool sand of Canon Beach, Oregon in late August and witnessed the most incredible sunset, two nights in a row.  Not all days end so perfectly but all days are complete enough to be included in the portfolio of life.    Have a great week!

 

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Alexander Supertramp And The Great Northwest – Part 3 ~Vancouver Island

Hugging the Shoreline blog

“Hugging Shore”

Something about driving your vehicle onto a ship to cross an international border is intriguing and so we had altered our plans once again to do just that. We arrived in Port Angeles, Washington about two hours prior to departure and had no problem getting a place in line for the popular Black Ball Ferry to Victoria, British Columbia. We even had time for a sit down breakfast at a busy main street diner, an authentic gathering place for working locals who apparently had hearty appetites. The portions were huge and the people watching and eavesdropping was enlightening. We had such a great experience while in coastal Washington that we would have delayed our departure had it not been for the anticipation of what was yet to come.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Hello Canada

Nanaimo collage blog

Nanaimo

The 23 mile crossing of the Straight went quickly. After going through customs “drive through” style, we found ourselves being pushed and pulled right through downtown Victoria in the congestion of traffic coming off the ship. It was late in the day and a two hour drive to Nanaimo was ahead of us. We would come back to Victoria another day when we were fresh we thought and we pushed on up the coast highway. Vancouver Island is not small. The main north and south road is over 300 miles long and the highest point is over 7000 feet. The majority of the island is not reachable by road so there is a ton of wilderness. Some doomsayers say that Vancouver Island is not a safe place to live in the event of earthquakes. After seeing how beautiful it is, I say “who cares?”. I’d live there in a heartbeat if circumstances allowed.

On the way to our reserved camp site in Nanaimo, we stopped at a farmers market to replenish our food supply. A small metal building was stocked to the ceiling with locally grown fruits and vegetables, we learned that almost everything grows on the island. In its offerings, this place made Whole Foods look like a small town convenience store. We arrived at our wooded seaside campsite in the late afternoon and we popped up Alexander Supertramp, ate produce for Dinner and turned in for the night. Fires were not permitted due to dry conditions on the island so we laid in bed and read as we discovered that our campground was anything but peaceful. I kid you not, dozens of french speaking children were shouting and screaming at the top of their cute little lungs. They were apparently having the time of their lives at some sort of youth camp nearby. Plans are meant to be changed, right?

We did end up staying in the campground one more night, enduring not only the Mickey Mouse Club but the addition of family reunion next door and one particular woman who never stopped talking. We needed a day of rest anyway and we rode our bikes into town and ate dinner. Nanaimo is a port town, pretty rough around the edges and very industrial. The harbor is a hub of activity with people coming and going by private vessels, ferries and float planes. As the day progressed, we decided that we would leave our reserved campsite and drive to the remote west side of the island in the morning.

Cathederal Grove blog

cathederal quiet blog

Cathedral Grove

I still had warm coffee in my cup as we arrived at Cathedral Grove, an old growth Cedar forest in the interior of the island. We spent an hour or so walking among the giants and snapping pictures, before continuing up route 4 to Port Alberni and the next 60 miles through the wilderness to the coast. The fog was thick when we arrived at a seaside village called Ucluelet and contrary to the rumors we heard, there were campsites available. We pushed on up the coast past Long Beach to the end of the road at Tofino. All of the bonafide campsites in Tofino were taken, reserved months in advance. Fortunately for us, there is a campground there that is something like a hostel for tents and R.V.’s. The rule seems to be that if you can find a place to put yourself, we will gladly accept your $60 and “no we don’t do windows..or bathrooms”. Oddly, it turned out to be the quietest night yet..go figure.

Tofino Dock blog

Tofino Marina

a walk before sunset blog

A Walk Before Sunset

Tofino Green blog

Tofino Sunset

In the afternoon, we rode a couple of Kilometers into the village of Tofino and had sushi on the patio of an Inn. We watched seaplanes coming and going and eavesdropped on a table of four Vancouver “Valley Girls” talking about how they “Soooo had to do this again”. Yea we do a lot of people observing, please don’t judge us for that. After dinner we photographed and pedaled our way back to camp just in time for sunset. The beach at Tofino has dozens of tiny timbered islands just off shore which adds up to fertile subject matter for the photographer. When the golden hour hits and there is that much to photograph, I can take my tripod and become entranced, losing all sense of time. As darkness fell, a crescent moon appeared over the horizon and people huddled around bon fires to stay warm.

"In The Bag"

“In The Bag”

Not crazy about staying another night in a parking lot and having to get up very early in the morning to make the long drive back to Nanaimo, we opted to head back across the island and we found ourselves that night in Qualicum Beach. We had now spent seven nights in a row in Alexander Supertramp and we longed for a hot shower and a running toilet and needed to do laundry, we rented a room for a night. It felt ok to have all the luxury but we both admitted that we missed sleeping in the camper. Early the next morning we headed for the port at Nanaimo to catch our reserved spot on the ferry to Horseshoe Bay on the Canadian mainland. We never did make it back into Victoria but no worries, we know we will go back some day, perhaps we will also go back to Tofino to watch the monster surf during a winter storm.

Moon Island blog

“Crescent Moon Over Tofino”

Trials And Errors In My Quest For Light and Life

sharkswavebuild 10x20

Waves crash into the reef at Sharks Cove on the North Shore of Oahu. Captured on video in 2011.

In all of my contemplations thus far as a painter, I have come to understand that the introduction of light is the most important element. Light is the top coat, the finisher, and ever so integrated in the story being told. Composition of the large shapes, the establishment of tonality and a focus on the essence of the subject matter are all important, but without light a painting will never be complete.

So how do I go about transforming my results to add light and life to my work? Fortunately, I am enrolled as a student at HKU (hard knock university). At 54, I don’t have time to waste with a more formal education so I scour the world of art through observation and I soak up inspiration like a sponge. I owe so much to the internet and as long as Kim Jong Un doesn’t “take it out” (and I don’t mean to dinner), I will continue to do so.   Currently, I’m learning about under paintings and glazings and I’m doing a lot of experimentation in hopes of achieving more vibrant results.

Have a gander at this unfinished work and give my your honest feedback if you will. The foam in the foreground in particular is what I’m struggling with. Do you like the hint of cotton candy? should I transform the hue one way or another?

Work In Progress - Winter Waves at Sharks Cove

Work In Progress – Winter Waves at Sharks Cove






I Survived The Autumnal Shift

scottstudio

Saying goodbye to Summer has always been hard for me and this year was no exception. Actually, I start slipping toward the inevitable melancholia of the Autumnal Shift as early as July 4th some years, Why? Perhaps that is when I am reminded that the exhilaration of Spring will soon give way to the mortality of another seasonal cycle. Hey, it’s not as though I’m in a continual state of depression, so please read on and don’t write me off prematurely as a downer! Fortunately, …Oddly, the Autumnal shift always ends around the first of November. As though a loud snapping of the fingers or perhaps or a proverbial slapping of the face awakens me into a more positive consciousness. I let go of what was and I embrace what is, and what will be. I welcome what is for me, the time of year that my creative spirit is most alive.

Lately, I have become immersed in the warmth and beauty of Hawaii, even though I’m in Colorado. Rather than painting mountain streams and waterfalls, rather than bringing to life snowy scenes I find myself compelled to capture the essence of the beach, the ocean and the waves. Transporting myself to this alternate reality is made somewhat easier with the aid of the extensive photo and video library that I have accumulated in recent years. The walls of my new spacious studio are beginning to fill up with compositional studies of the Mid-Pacific. As an artist, it feels good to be growing once again.

In My Mind’s Eye

"From Here To Eternity"  18" X 24" Acrylic on Canvas

“From Here To Eternity” 18″ X 24″ Acrylic on Canvas

In my mind’s eye, I can see the eastern horizon off Oahu. Molokai, Lanai and the upper reaches of Haleakala on Maui somewhere below the rising sun. In my mind’s eye, I can see a Humpback’s breach or the glistening skin of a Dolphin as it stitches it’s way across the fabric of the Sea. In my mind’s eye, I can feel the refreshing breeze, I can smell the salt laced air and I can hear the crashing waves as they meet the rocky shores.

Hundred’s of times, I have driven past the very beach that was used for the passionate love scene in the 1953 movie “From Here to Eternity”. It is located along the Kalanianaole (Kal) Highway on Oahu’s eastern shore. Halona Beach Cove sits just on the other side of the guard rail of this winding stretch of pavement. The image that is etched in my mind is the one seen only in the fleeting glances from the drivers seat of a vehicle. For me, the sensory euphoria that dwells here is best captured in a photograph of the mind then painted on canvas, no reference material is necessary or desired.