Lost Souls Of The Grand Staircase

 

Jupiter Rising 3500

The month of May found me in a state of improving health and the itch for adventure and exercise needed attention. My Wife and I didn’t have to study the map long before placing a pin on the Red Rock Country of Southern Utah. We even arranged to rendezvous with my In-Laws so that we could share the experience.  Why Southern Utah you might ask. For one thing, Denver was still getting pounded by turbulent Spring weather just as high pressure was taking hold to the West. Furthermore, this is the time of the year that deep canyon floors are thriving with green hues and runoff from the high country. The two of us and our Italian Greyhound Gracie were packed and on the road, destination Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument.

Willow Creek Reflection HDR 3500

The Staircase is special. It is one of the most remote and beautiful places in the desert southwest and during previous visits my exploration had only scratched the surface. The plan for this trip was to do as much desert hiking as possible and to experience the solitude of a wilderness that is now at risk of losing its protected status. I also needed to get a photography fix in the worst way. I had hardly picked up the camera since last fall when I fell ill and I couldn’t wait to get back to it. For hiking, I pulled my old trustee Asolo boots out of storage. They had carried me up half of Colorado’s Fourteeners when I was much younger. Surely they would serve me well in the desert.

True North 3500

It’s always good to have an audio book on hand for long drives. For this trip I selected “Finding Everett Ruess” by David Roberts. His true story documents the life of a free spirited explorer who vanished without a trace from the Escalante region in the 1930’s. The book originally caught my attention because the forward was written by John Krakauer who wrote “Into the Wild”, one of my favorites. The subject of Krakauer’s book was Christopher McCandless, also a free spirited explorer who spent a great deal of time in the Desert Southwest. McCandless, who ended up starving to death in the Alaska wilderness, went by the alias “Alexander Supertramp”. I so much love the story that I named my camper “Alexander Supertramp” long ago.

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Sometimes the Universe aligns itself in such a way that you cannot deny that something is meant to be. That is exactly what happened on this trip to the Grand Staircase. Here we were in a rig named “Alexander Supertramp” following the footsteps of a free spirited lost soul and while hiking near the last know location of Everett Ruess, the soles of my Asolo boots peeled off, one after another. You can’t make this stuff up. It was a great trip!

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Don’t Judge An Image By Its Thumbnail

 

chairs sunset FB copy

I consider myself pretty lucky these days. The line between work and play has diminished to the point where I find myself doing pretty much the same thing on vacation that I do when I’m on assignment. I’m a photographer through and through. Every getaway is planned just enough to set me on a path that is likely to intersect with inspirational subject matter, but I never know ahead of time exactly what will be on the other side of the lens when I begin releasing the shutter.

Hello Bear FB

“Bear Alley”

 

My Wife and I made our annual journey to Crested Butte, Colorado last week to see the high alpine wildflowers at their peak. After finding a place to call home for six nights, a powerful thunderstorm descended on the valley and dropped an inch or two of rain. About an hour before sunset, the skies began to clear and I set out into the woods to see what I could capture. At first I found myself struggling find anything but by the end of the outing I had filled the better part of a 16GB data card. The golden hour did not disappoint. I returned to camp after dark. My jeans, sneakers and socks were just as soaked as they would have been if i’d jumped into the river.

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Several days after returning to Denver, I found myself immersed in the business of processing seven SDHC cards. As is my routine I began working on the images that I was most excited about, the ones that I anticipated to be the best and I made sure I saved all of the images with potential to the hard drive. As is also my routine, I took one last tour through each of the cards to clear them for formatting (erasing) only to realize that I had hastily written off the images from that cold, wet first night. I had forgotten that in that moment I was inspired by the mood of the evening and I was shooting with a purpose. I very nearly tossed these moments into the trash can.  Once again I’m reminded not to judge an image unworthy without first considering why I captured it in the first place.

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The Accidental Paparazzi

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“As Close As I Dare” – I basically crawled to the edge of the Goose Neck turn of the Colorado River, afraid the bank would cave in.

I’ve been editing photos like a maniac several days now and I’m finally ready to share more. Last week’s photo expedition to the Utah Desert was a success and I’ll be sharing a bunch or images. I’ll keep it short and sweet this morning and simply brag about the fact that we drove Alexander Supertramp right through the middle of a Hollywood set on the remote Shafer Canyon Road, the back road into Canyonlands National Park. We knew something was up when we took note of a campsite along the Colorado River. A long ticky tacky row of luxury tents and heated outdoor sitting areas were the first signs that something big was being filmed nearby. It turned out that HBO is filming a mini series, a remake of the 1970’s movie “Westworld”.

mail wagon BLOG

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The set of “Westworld”

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A lot of movies have been filmed in these canyons over the years and on this day, they were filming at “Thelma and Louse Point”. At a crest in the road, we literally drove less than ten feet from the actors, dressed up in western wear, plates in hand waiting in line to eat lunch. We had no idea at that moment that we might have been rubbing elbows with Ed Harris or Anthony Hopkins.  I’ve got to get a dash cam! Anyway, it all caught us so much by surprise that all I managed to capture with the camera was from a distance. I managed a few shots from the drivers seat with my long lens just before the Sheriff escorted us on down the road. So if you end up watching “Westworld” on HBO, look for Alexander Supertramp in the background during a cemetery scene.

alex canyon bottom BLOG

Alexander Supertramp And The Great Northwest ~ Final Chapter

Atnarko BLOG

We awoke to the music of the Atnarko River, its rhythm throbbing with life. It’s a wonderful joy to wake up so excited about exploring a beautiful place that you’ve never been before. At first light, I ducked through the small camper doorway and scampered down the steps, Camera in hand and bear spray on my hip. Bears before breakfast? We only had one neighbor in the campground, a couple who we had met the previous evening. They were in a hard sided truck camper and pulled a trailer with a canoe and what looked like every camping gadget imaginable. I had beat them to the punch and I stood all alone on the banks of the river. The low morning sun streamed through the forest, illuminating the mist that hovered the surface of the water and the Salmon that spawned below. All alone, I stood there and marveled at being in one of the worlds most beautiful places without throngs of tourists.

Salmon Run

Salmon Run

Tagging Salmon

Tagging Salmon

During our four day visit to the Bella Coola Valley, we quickly became acquainted with a cast of characters whom we would bump into repeatedly while searching for Grizzlies. In no time at all, we were on a first name basis with the couple I previously mentioned, then there was the young couple from Vancouver and a German Couple who had been there for a week and had not seen a bear. We also got to know the river guides, the forestry agent and few other locals who completed our network and steered us toward places to go and things to see. From everything we gathered, it was determined that we were a week to ten days early for the full swing Salmon feeding season.

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Our Bear Guide, Fraser

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“Root Bear Float”

Ultimately, I didn’t find in Bella Coola what my mind was expecting, it was better. While we didn’t find Grizzlies around every bend but we did have encounters that we will always remember. We had discovered the absolute magnificence of a very remote coastal rainforest that is filled with glaciers, waterfalls and old growth forests. A Valley that rivals Yosemite, Yellowstone or Rocky Mountain National Park, only here you have a highway almost all to yourself. This is one of those places that you just know you will go back to.

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The long, long, long drive home to Colorado took us through Jasper and Banff where the smoke from Washington State Wild Fires was so thick that photography became a waste of time. While not quite as thick, the smoke persisted almost all the way back to Denver. We had been gone for 20 nights and had driven almost exactly 5000 miles. The summer of 2015 will always be remembered as the summer of Alexander Supertramp and the Great Northwest.

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Ft. Mcleod in Southern Alberta

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Smokey Sunset in Southern Alberta

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Sunset over the Bighorn River in Montana

A Selfie, A Grandson And A Skeleton Tree

"Skeleton Tree"

“Skeleton Tree”

There is a time to stay home and a time to hit the pavement and put on the miles. For me, staying home is an opportunity to finish things, to edit and post and promote the work that I’ve done and to check off items from the never ending task list of Life. The problem with staying home however is that I get too comfortable in my habits and routines and I flat out don’t exercise enough. Ultimately, I end up feeling uninspired and creatively unchallenged, an ailment that can only be remedied by going out and seeing a familiar thing in a new way or an unfamiliar thing in a curious way. I love coming home with images that never would have been captured without some pavement pounding.

Monday and Tuesday we travelled to Southern Colorado to visit our youngest Daughter, her husband and especially the newest addition to all of our Lives, my first Grandchild. We took Alexander Supertramp (camper) with us and parked it steps away from their front door. I have to tell you, my little Grandson is the cutest baby in the history of the world! Yes this is my Blog and yes, I am going to show you baby pictures.

First Selfie With My Grandson

First Selfie With My Grandson

Grandma is in Love

Grandma is in Love

Daddy's Touch

Daddy’s Touch

The "not fair look" starts young

The “not fair look” starts young

Mommy's Touch

Mommy’s Touch

Grandaddy's Hands

Grandaddy’s Hands

It was really hard to leave the little guy but we could only be gone one night so we headed back to Denver the long way in hope of catching brilliant colors along the Arkansas River. Too early, the leaves of the Cottonwoods were still quite green. As we hit the lower Valley, it occurred to me that My wife had never been to the edge of the Royal Gorge, despite passing within a mile or two a number of times. We grabbed the exit and drove up the hill to the north rim, a five minute drive at the most. After gawking at the precipitous vistas and taking note of how cool it would be to do the zip line across, we drove back down the hill. Thats where we saw the “Skeleton Tree”.

Tam and Gracie at the Royal  Gorge

Tam and Gracie at the Royal Gorge

My wife pointed the “Skeleton Tree” to me and said I should shoot it. She has a really good eye for design and I rely on that constantly. I hit the brakes hard, parked and jumped out, camera and tripod in hand. What a gift that tree was. Here we had gone all day not seeing what we thought we’d see, and now we were seeing something that we didn’t expect on a hillside recently ravaged by wildfire. The thing I really love about this image is that there is so much beauty in something that is dead, a needed reminder that the world will still be beautiful, even without leaves for the winter.

World Famous Royal Gorge

World Famous Royal Gorge

The First Annual Father/Son Photo Expedition

Sagebrush Symphony

Sagebrush Symphony

As you can tell from my posts, I’ve been bitten hard by the photography bug and am having a bit of a challenge keeping up with all the editing. I seriously haven’t forgotten to finish my story about the trip to see Grizzly Bears, I’m just putting it on hold, taking advantage of the season to bank images of Autumn in Colorado. Last weekend, my two grown Sons and myself loaded our gear into the camper and headed out in search of nature’s seasonal grand finale. We didn’t even know where the journey would lead us. We would drive as far west and south as necessary to find ourselves surrounded by peak colors.

Darkness fell just as we reached the summit of Monarch Pass and we pondered camping there for the night until we realized how frigid the air temperature was. Onward we pushed past Gunnison to the shore of Blue Mesa Reservoir, Colorado’s largest body of water. The air temperature was so much more tolerable and we were staged for a night of astral photography. Blue Mesa sits generally in the center of Colorado. Far enough from city lights, and with a low horizon in all directions, the night sky there is stunning. After a quick spaghetti dinner we went to work.

Midnight at Blue Mesa BLOG

Midnight At Blue Mesa

Approaching Storm

Approaching Storm

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Sagebrush Moonrise

Night photography is a genre made ever so much more interesting by the latest camera technology. The newest full sensor cameras have ISO sensitivities that enable the camera to see things in the dark that the human eye cannot see. As we stood on the shore of the lake, dialing in camera settings and experimenting with the low light conditions, a dark mass of lightning producing clouds slowly edged closer to us from the west. To the naked eye, the setting was strangely sirene. In the review monitor of my camera, the setting was ominous. At some point I realized that it had been a while since the last flash of lightning and the big dark blob was now blocking out the stars to the west. The Boys and I deduced simultaneously that we better head back for the camper and we scurried with no time to spare. A wall of water and wind hit the sides of Alexander Supertramp (camper) just as we closed ourselves in. We laughed about our close call and talked about the adventures of the day.

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michaelcreek

boys shooting

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Mt. Sneffels

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“Colorado Pops”

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“In The Bank”

Michael, Luke and I resumed our quest for colorful leaves first thing in the morning. We drove west to Montrose, still disappointed by the post-peak fall foliage. We wondered if we were too late. Fortunately, not long after turning south once again, we began to notice ribbons and patches of yellow, gold, red and even a lot of green in the San Juan Mountains, we had arrived! Leaf Chasing is a lot like storm chasing. You never really know where you’ll end up. We followed the vivid luminous colors onto a dirt road on the Dallas Divide, climbing slowly but surely to the base of Mt. Sneffels. By the end of the day we had gathered images in the thousands and as the sun was setting, we found a high mountain meadow where we could set up camp.

campsite sunset BLOG

Dinner was incredible. Chopped garden vegetables, potatoes and apple sausage cooked in foil packets on the coals of the campfire. There were lots of smiles and laughs around the fire that night and we talked about making this trip the first of many, a new tradition. As the last light of the day vanished to the west, more stars than you can imagine appeared in the night sky. We doused the fire and went into the camper to get warm, prepare equipment and get bundled up for another night of Photography.

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Luke Skywalker

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I can’t handle the cold like I did when I was younger. I shivered in the October midnight air, even with three coats and a blanket over me. We were actually lucky that we weren’t dealing with snow on the ground, after all we were above 10,000 feet. By the time all was said and done, the first rays of the rising moon were hitting the tips of the mountain range in front of us and as the nocturnal golden hour progressed, the light of the Moon spilled down into the golden aspen forest. We were all snug in bed by 2am.

Sunday would lead us into the picturesque town of Ouray for a hearty breakfast, before making the five hour journey home to Denver.

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My Great Harvest Blood Moon Eclipse

Denver Eclipse Interior BLOG

Lunar Eclipse Over Denver

Thank You for being here, for taking the time to read my rambling. Writing is something I’m compelled to do I guess, for without it I would feel trapped in this life without a voice. Having somebody there on the other end completes the circuit and creates the spark that ignites purpose. In the same way I’m compelled to use visual images to speak for me when I cannot find the words. So Thank You, Thank You, Thank You for being such an important part of my life.

Do You get sidetracked as often as I do? On visits to local retailers, do you find yourself actually forgetting what you came to buy? Have you ever been focussed on a task with the pinpoint accuracy of a laser? When that beam is suddenly refracted in another direction, do you follow? For me, getting sidetracked is a common occurrence. Today’s post should have been part 6 of the Alexander Supertramp Adventure, yet I find myself putting that on hold in favor of a more current event. Don’t worry, I’m not a quitter, I’ll finish the story of our recent journey to see Grizzly Bears in Bella Coola, British Columbia, but today I want to share My Great Harvest Blood Moon Eclipse assignment!

A couple of weeks ago, I started hearing the news about an upcoming Lunar Eclipse that promised to be a once, or maybe twice in a lifetime celestial event. This is where I got sidetracked. All of the important things that I’m working on were set on the side shelf and the next thing I know, I’m researching, scouting viewing spots and feverishly using iPhone apps like the Photographers Ephemeris and Sky Guide. The race was on. All In all, I planned on catching three full moonrises in a row on Saturday, Sunday and Monday nights.

moon denver BLOG

Saturday Night,,Hmm..too early

Saturday night, the waxing moon came up over the eastern horizon while the strong setting sun lit up the foreground. Interesting results, but not the jaw dropping image that I had in mind.

Sunset Before Moonrise

Sunset Before Moonrise

Sunday night, my Wife and grown up Daughter joined me on the shore of Sloans Lake, just to the west of downtown. There was already one other photographer set and ready to go when we arrived. I felt validated for choosing a good spot yet strangely surprised. As the most incredible sunset lit the entire western sky and dipped beyond the Rockies, people began to show up in droves. Are there really this many people in this town that will pass on a Broncos game to watch the moon, I pondered. I have to say, my faith in humanity was bolstered somewhat and it was amazing to watch so many other people entranced by the spectacle. The stage was set and as the Giant Red and Orange Moon slipped above the eastern horizon, a hushing silence cast a spell on the crowd of witnesses. We stayed right there on the shore of the lake until the moon was well up into the sky, morphing into a fully shaded orb.

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Witness

Monday night, my Daughter and I found ourselves at the top of Lookout Mountain in Golden. The plan was simple, Capture the rising full moon above metro Denver while the lights of city streets an downtown dressed the foreground. As we positioned ourselves beyond the guardrail at a precipitous mountain switchback, we took in the view to the west, a vista that included Clear Creek Canyon and the Continental Divide. We hoped for an impressive sunset since the sky to the East was cloudy and my hopes for a dramatic moonrise began to wane. The sunset was just ok and I began to wonder if night number three was one too many. Just after sunset however, more people started showing up and the heavy haze to the East and began to subside. As the giant red and orange moon rose above the horizon there was just enough of an opening in the clouds on the eastern horizon to let the light through in dramatic fashion, just enough time to snap off a couple of sets of bracketed photos.

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My Gorgeous Daughter

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Clear Creek Canyon At Sunset

Bikes BLOG

getting busy

check out this Looney! I didn't even have time to focus

check out this Looney! I didn’t even have time to focus

Getting sidetracked turned out to be a really cool thing and I was able to share some memorable moments with a couple of my favorite people.

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Moon Over Denver

Alexander Supertramp And The Great NorthWest – Part 5 ~ The Hill

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The Hill

A person wanting to drive a vehicle to the coastal mountains of Canada has only three choices. We had already tread the well kept pavement of Highway 1 out of Vancouver to the interior and made our way north to Williams Lake. There is also Highway 16, the heavily travelled Yellowhead Highway to Prince Rupert which was a few hundred miles north of us. It was our intention all along to head West on Hwy. 20, the third alternative which would take us to our destination, Bella Coola and Grizzly Bears feeding on Salmon.

The Cariboo Chilcotin Coast is a huge swath of wilderness, perhaps the most remote area I’ve ever travelled to, including Alaska. Highway 20 is called the Freedom Highway, perhaps because if is over 300 miles with very few signs of civilization, or perhaps because a long stretch of it is free from pavement, guardrails, passing room and reasonable inclines. Soon after leaving Williams lake, I learned the hard way that even trying to do 50mph was unwise due to the likelihood of a Deer, Moose or Bear jumping out in front of us. At one point, after a brief distraction of some sort I looked up to see an elk as tall as my hood standing dead center with my trajectory. The loud scream of my locked tires sliding on pavement seemed to last forever and everything moved in slow motion. For an instant that seemed like an eternity, I accepted that our trip had been prematurely ended with the slaughter of a beautiful beast and the demise of Alexander Supertramp, what a bummer. Somehow, some way the giant creature vanished as quickly as he had appeared and we were continuing down the road like it never even happened.

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Nimpo Lake

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Alexander Supertramp at Nimpo Lake

We made it roughly halfway to Bella Coola before dusk and found a campsite at Nimpo Lake where we watched the sunset, ate dinner and went to bed. We went to sleep that night to the calming melody of a loon and the melancholy cry of a real life lone wolf, sounds that don’t exist where we come from. At sunrise, I stood on the shore and took in the beauty of the deep blue lake and the surrounding mountain ranges in the Tweedsmuir Provincial Park. A float plane taxi’d across the lake in the cool morning air then lifted into the azure blue sky for a morning of sightseeing. After a breakfast of instant oatmeal, we lowered the top of our mobile bungalow and headed down the road with a long trail of dust streaming in our wake.

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Tweedsmuir Air

The two thousand foot descent into the Bella Coola Valley is affectionately known as the Hill. Over two thousand miles into our journey and it had all boiled down to a one lane dirt road with 18% grades and spine tingling switchbacks. This section requires one foot on the brake, two hands on the wheel and an earful of advice on how to drive from your spouse. To be fair, I would not have been a happy passenger either. I was glad to be in control. To make matters worse, we had watched a number of youtube videos from “The Hill” and had worked ourselves into somewhat of an unnecessary anticipatory frenzy. Obviously we lived to see another day and I can now say that I drove “The Hill” twice, once down and once up.

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There’s a good reason this pic sucks!

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Switchback

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Freedom Highway

Just like with the Elk, when we arrived at the valley floor the paved highway resumed and it was the Hill never happened. Over the course of the next four days, we would become very familiar with the final twenty mile stretch of highway to the coast as we drove it daily in search of Grizzly Bears. But as we saw it for the first time there was a heightened level of appreciation for the mountains and glaciers and rivers. Before the sun set that first night we stood along the banks of the Atnarko River and waited for our first Bear sighting. Sure enough a 600 lb. Boar was “snorkeling” his way down current toward us and with Bear Spray and my camera in hand, I trembled as clumsily began taking pictures. Grizzly Bears feeding on Salmon..Check. We camped for the night along the River, cozy and warm within the confines of the hard and soft sided Alexander Supertramp. Every now and then the peaceful sound of the river would be interrupted with a ”Shhhhh…did you hear that? what was that?”

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“Who Sees Who?”

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snorkeling bear

“Power”

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“Atnarko Sunset”

Alexander Supertramp And The Great Northwest – Part 4 ~ Whistler and Beyond

Goodbye Vancouver Island

Goodbye Vancouver Island

We left Vancouver Island on a full ferry, crossed the Straight of Georgia and connected with the Canadian mainland at Horseshoe Bay. Seeing Vancouver was on the trip checklist and we found ourselves on the winding four lane road heading directly into the city. Something didn’t feel right. Really seeing and experiencing Vancouver would require at least on overnight stay. Before we even got a glimpse of the skyline we grabbed an exit and came about back toward what we craved most, to get into the wild.

Hello Vancouver (almost)

Hello Vancouver (almost)

Arriving at Horseshoe Bay

Arriving at Horseshoe Bay

The Sea to Sky Highway followed the shore of the Howe Sound for 28 miles where we found ourselves being drawn into the parking lot of a tourist gondola at Squamish. We were in the land of Fjords and Glaciers and the idea of getting a birds eye view was irresistible. I grew up with Gondolas in the ski town of Vail, Colorado. In fact I was in high school in 1976 on the day that two of the cars fell to the ground. Details of three dead and nine critically injured were broadcast over the school intercom and every since that day I have been cautious about trams. The Sea to Sky Gondola was a good experience. Tammy and I had a car to ourselves on the ride up. We snapped “selfies”, gawked at the scenery and yawned to pop our ears as we quickly gained over 2400 vertical feet. After eating lunch on the observation deck, we strolled across a cable suspension bridge and through the forest, taking in our first up close views of the precipitous and glaciated coastal mountains.

Sea to Sky

Sea to Sky

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There was a long line at the upper tram terminal for the ride down which we were able to circumvent as the lift attendants were in need of two for a car that was loading. We were kept company by a pair of grim faced women who said nothing the entire ride down and a family of four who I judgmentally guessed could not speak English. It turns out they were from Toronto and as Canadian as maple syrup. When we told them that we had driven from Colorado and we were heading 12 hours north to see Grizzly Bears, they asked “Why do you want to do that, Eh”. All in all, the day was incredible. After all of the tough times we had been through in the previous year, it was good to just feel like we were two kids on a date.

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A couple of hours later, we found ourselves driving through the villages of the Whistler Ski Area, contemplating a place to park for the night. It was interesting to see what Canada’s world class resort looked like, how it felt in comparison to Vail and the large Colorado resorts. It didn’t take much of that however and we found ourselves heading on down the road in search of “The Wild”. We ended up pulling into a rustic campground at sunset, parking Alexander Supertramp next to a picnic table and a river. For the first time on our journey, we had escaped civilization and the masses of humanity, we were finally alone.

Alexander Supertramp in the Wild

Alexander Supertramp in the Wild

“Nocturne”

Time Out For Gracie

Tammy and Gracie blog

“Nap Time”

This post was meant to be the next chapter of my chronicle about our recent adventures in British Columbia, however the pause button was hit hard this week. We adopted an Italian Greyhound. At the National Mill Dog Rescue in Colorado Springs, they called her Betsy. Nobody knows what they called her while she was caged for her entire six years of life, regarded as livestock, an asset on which the return was dwindling. She certainly would have been written off the books had NMDR not stepped in.

The moratorium on new pet acquisitions within our family evaporated in the blink of an eye. The last of our four beloved canines passed on (“went to college”) last year and I told my Wife we had to travel 30,000 miles before we brought a new dog home. Lets see, We’ll put last spring’s trip to Guatemala generously at 5000 miles and last months trip to the Northwest at 5000 miles. We made it a third of the way and besides, if Mama ain’t happy!….

When we brought home Betsy, now called Gracie, she was scared to death. In particular, opening and shutting doors, shuffling paper and darkness set her off into a trembling panic. Tammy showed her, perhaps for the first time what it was like to stand in the cool grass on a warm day, to have a bed that was her very own, to accept the soft touch of loving hands in a place that would become home.

If you aren’t familiar with “Iggy’s, you aren’t alone. I’m not sure that I had ever seen one before. She is highly intelligent and curious, watches TV as if the images are real people and she tests the perimeter of all enclosures like a Jurassic Park Raptor. She is lightning quick..”duh.. Greyhound”. They say that if they get loose outside, you may never find them and I believe it. Just trying to get to her to put a leash on can be like trying to corral a wild horse. Once and only once it left me looking and feeling like a Colorado Buffalo Defensive back on a really bad day, I won’t go through that humiliation again. You might also look at an “Iggy” and think that it looks like a baby fawn. Imagine how freaked out I was when I was all alone with her and she started howling like a wolf. I had no idea. Tammy did some reading and is hypothesizing that she has indeed become the alpha for which Gracie will forever howl to find in the future. “Recalculating”.

Three days in and things are looking up. Gracie and our two cats look like they will get along. Gracie is showing some promise of being a travel dog at some point in the future. More than anything, its good to see the smile on Tammy’s face, fulfilled for now with her passion for the animal kingdom.

Goodnight Gracie

Goodnight Gracie