How Digital Art Can Help You Become A Better Painter

In The Studio..How do you know its done?

In The Studio..How do you know its done?

At a very young age, I learned from my Father the virtues of working hard and finishing what has been started. In our house, quitting was not an option, at least not if I wanted to avoid disappointing him and the consequences that would likely follow. Somewhere around age six, I decided that the guitar was not for me. I had been taking lessons in the back room of a music store for perhaps several months. I remember how sore my fingers became, pushing down on the steel strings for hours each day while I struggled my way though Camp Town Races and Clair de lune. The deal breaker for me undoubtedly came on the day of my first Recital. I was baptized by fire in that overcrowded room as it fell silent in anticipation of a performance by Moi. I may as well have been naked, for right then and there I exposed to the world my frets and my fretting. This was not for me.

Today, I see how my Dad’s lessons on quitting have helped me with my patience and perseverance. I’ve done a lot of things and succeeded as well because of what he taught me. The problem is I now I have a difficult time knowing when it is appropriate to quit, a confusion that plays out nowhere more than in my art. When is a video as good as it can be, when is a photograph ready to be archived, when is a painting really ready for that signature, not to be touched again? The answer most often only comes with the test of time. My painting studio is also a gallery. I hang my more recent work on the walls so I can use it as reference but also so I can study it often. What I find is that over time it becomes clearer to me whether or not a piece is finished, unfinished or worthy of the junk pile.

Experimenting with a painting on iPad

Experimenting with a painting on iPad

Thanks to Steve Jobs, I now have a new way of using technology to experiment with and make hypothetical changes to my existing work. Take my most recent painting called “Perpetual Motion” as an example. I basically completed if fairly quickly, at least to the point of its first critique. My wife accurately pointed out that the lines between the water, wet sand and dry sand really needed more definition. I agreed and identified a number of other things that bothered me as well. After downloading a photo of the piece into the ArtStudio app on my iPad, I was able to experiment with enhancements in a most fearless way. Throw in fine lines or broad washes, not a problem. Add opacity or transparency, piece of cake. Change course and try something else, simply click the “undo” button and start over. I’m actually blown away with how realistic electronic “painting” has become and how effective it can be as an aid in my process.

"Perpetual Motion"  (12"x 48") Acrylic on Canvas

Finished! “Perpetual Motion” (12″x 48″) Acrylic on Canvas

No doubt, digital art is becoming more and more prevalent. You might say it would even impress the Impressionists.  Look online and it won’t take you long to see how some folks are painting en plain air on tablets and with impressive results. Go to the movies these days and you’ll see how much this art form has been embraced by Hollywood. For Me and for now, I see it as a tool that can help me be a better painter. Do you think digital painting is cheating? Have you worked with a digital painting program? If so, I’d like to hear about your experience.

2 thoughts on “How Digital Art Can Help You Become A Better Painter

  1. I have not used a digital painting program, although my techy advisors say I should definitely make use of its availability, and yes, I see your point as to its use in experimenting with possible options without touching the original..,I feel like digital art is virtual and doesn’t really exist until its printed. I do think that these programs can be a great teaching tool, but I doubt that the finished product can achieve the same physical result. That statement might label me as stubborn and old fashioned but there is much to be said for original works on canvas, especially in finished form. Even a reproduction by high quality professional photography cannot capture the fine points, depth of color and lyrical high and low lights of a painting, thus diminishing the artist’s work in some form or another. The National Gallery pointed to this the other day on their facebook post….that’s why we art lover’s go to galleries and museums to see the original!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s